New Product For Detangling Black and Afro Textured Hair

We have a new product available for detangling natural Black and Afro Textured hair. The product is called Northwest Scents Detangling and Cleansing Cream. It feels like a conditioner, but you use it like a shampoo. It cleanses without leaving the hair “squeaky” and while the product is in your hair (it should be put into your hair when your hair is soaking wet during the washing process) you can gently comb through your hair with a wide tooth comb to detangle it.
For more about detangling please see my earlier post

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Question about my hair routine

Question: Can you please tell me your method of how you grew your hair, and how long it took, because i want to regrow my hair naturally, thank you.

Answer: Hi. My method began when I realized that the problem wasn’t that my hair wasn’t growing, it was breaking off. So instead of focusing on how to help it grow, because it was already growing, I decided to focus on how not to break off my hair. Then I started analyzing all of the things that I was doing to take care of my hair. I looked at how I washed it, styled it, what products I used on it, etc. I looked at whether or not my hair was breaking when I handled it, and I changed my routines to work with my hair so that it stopped breaking off.

For example, my old hair washing routine would be:

1. Take down hair
2. Wet hair, apply shampoo, scrub scalp, rinse
3. Repeat step 2
4. Apply conditioner, rinse
5. Towel dry, then comb through hair

Realizing that I needed to make some changes, I decided to look at the products I was using. I’ve never really been a product junkie. When I was younger I would use whatever was in the house, then when I got married I used my husband’s brand (St. Ives), and later on I decided to go more natural, and started using a natural liquid castile soap as my shampoo. During this time I had noticed that my hair was never really soft, but I didn’t think about it too much. It wasn’t until I started really taking a look at my hair care practices, that I decided to change my method, and change my hair products. I tried different natural shampoos (Jason’s, Nature’s Gate) but none of them really worked out for me. So I formulated my own brand (Northwest Scents™) which has made the difference for me in how my hair feels and how easy it is to work with.

Then I looked at my hair washing and conditioning method. My old method caused hair breakage due to the type of shampoo I was using, and because I would comb through my hair after I was done washing and conditioning it. I discovered that the best time to comb through natural, textured black hair is when the hair is wet and has something it in that allows a comb to pass through easily (like a rich natural conditioner).

Now my hair washing routine is:

1. Take down hair
2. Section into braids.
3. Wet hair, and wash each braid individually.
4. Condition each braid individually.
5. While hair is still wet, in braids, and with conditioner in it, detangle each braid individually.

Even though my new routine is more work, it isn’t as much work as it looks like, and it is easier on my hair. This has resulted in reducing hair breakage, which has resulted in hair growth. I talk more about my routine, and other things that I do in my book – Twelve Steps For Growing Black Hair.

As far as a time frame, once I started using my new method, I saw a difference in 30 days. It wasn’t a huge difference, because hair only grows 1/4″ to 1/2″ a month. But I still saw a difference. I could tell that my hair was getting longer because I could see a little bit of growth. I also wasn’t loosing as much hair as before. It took longer to see a dramatic difference because I still had some things to change. I loosened up my hairstyle and I stopped using brushes. This has helped my hair to grow back along my hairline where I had lost some hair.

Detangling Black Hair

I believe that one of the keys to growing black hair is detangling it effectively. My favorite way to begin the detangling process is to use a generous amount of Northwest Scents™ hair conditioner (made with coconut oil and lots of moisturizers) on my hair when I am washing it, and to comb it out in individual sections, beginning at the ends, and working my way down to the roots. I talk more about detangling in the book Twelve Steps For Growing Black Hair.

Natural Black Hair Care Tip – Dealing With Knots

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This is a photo of my natural hair right before I press it. It tends to knot at the ends and it takes work to deal with the knots. But working out the knots helps to preserve hair length, so it is something I’ve decided to take the time to do. I’ve decided that there are three ways to deal with knots: 1) Decide it if is a knot in the first place. Sometimes the kinks feel like knots, but actually aren’t. 2) If it is a knot, try to work it out using hair oil or a thin needle. When I encounter a knot I try to gently unloosen it. When my hair is moisturized it is easy to remove knots that aren’t too tight. Sometimes I take a thin pin and put it in the center of the knot and gently unloosen it. 3) If the knot is unworkable, remove as many hairs as possible from the knot, and then cut the knot out. I try to work the knot down to one or two hairs and then if it is joining two hairs together, I cut it off. I hate this last option, but sometimes it has to be done.

Northwest Scents™ Natural Black Hair Care Products

repairkit608Some people mistakenly believe that the products you use on your hair don’t make a difference. I have found the opposite to be true, especially when it comes to black hair. I have done research in the area of cosmetic science for the past several years, and in doing so I have developed a line of products which I use to take care of my hair. This line consists of a shampoo, hair oil, and hair conditioners. I designed these products to gently cleanse and condition my hair (dry, kinky, type 4c hair) and make it more manageable. These products are made using natural vegetable oils and essential oils, and are free from petrolatum, mineral oil, paraffin wax, harsh detergents like sodium lauryl sulfate, and artificial colors. Click here to see the products.